The Tortoise and the Hare

Do you remember the story of the tortoise and the hare? I’m sure you do, this is a story I feel every child is told. Slow and steady wins the race – that is the great truth that many adults who tell this story to children want to convoy.

When I look back to the story of the tortoise and the hare, there are two things we can learn that I think is screaming at us to understand, and neither is slow and stead wins the race.

First, focus on you. When we look at the tortoise in this story, one thing that he does is run his race. He isn’t concerned about the race the hare is running. If he tried to keep up with the hare, he would tire out and quit the race. Also, when he saw the hare napping if he decided to take a break himself, the hare might wake up and beat him to the finish line. But no, the tortoise ran his race at his pace, being confident in his skills and worrying more about finishing the race.

Second is don’t be arrogant. If we look at the story, the tortoise didn’t win because slow and steady wins the race, the tortoise wins because the hare gets so far ahead that he decides to take a nap. In his arrogance, he believed that even with taking a nap he could still win the race.

So next time you hear the story of the tortoise and the hare, or you read it to a child, remember what we need to learn is NOT slow and steady wins the race, instead learn to focus on you and don’t be arrogant.

Both good life lessons, no matter how old you are.

Read more

tumblr_ly89rbrksb1rnuqkzo1_500I’m sure you’ve heard the quote that goes something like: “Leaders are readers”

There is another one that I feel is just as, if not more, important:

“There is no difference between those who can’t read and those who can but don’t.”

Seems simple, but the ability to read doesn’t increase intelligence. It merely creates the potential to gain intelligence, to be changed by more ideas and art and timeless stories.

Are there books that you have wanted to, or maybe have even bought, but haven’t read yet? What is stopping you from reading them?

Capitol of the World

Read this in John C. Maxwell’s 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader this weekend and wanted to share it with everyone.

In a short story titled “The Capitol of the World,” Nobel prize-winning author Ernest Hemingway tells about a father and teenage son, Paco, whose relationship breaks down. After the son runs away from home, the father begins a long journey in search of him. Finally as a last resort, the man puts an ad in the local newspaper in Madrid. It reads, “Dear Paco… all is forgiven… I love you.” The next morning in front of the newspaper office were eight hundred men named Paco, desiring to restore a broken relationship. Never underestimate the power of relationships on people’s lives.